Juventus-Novara match analysis: “Pirlo Ball” already seen!

It is our duty to take Juve-Novara (5-0) very seriously, the first and last friendly of the pre-season played by the Bianconeri this Sunday morning.

Regardless of market developments, absences and so on (any future changes), a solar fact is that Pirlo’s hand can already be seen. To me it even seemed far beyond the macroscopic changes, as can be the passage of the system that we will mainly talk about today. Compared to Sarri, the obsession with domination through dribbling remains, yes, the high pressing and immediate re-aggression remain, but in a more updated, more avant-garde version.

In fact, the team seemed more fluid, as if released, and the direction was finally widespread, no longer the monopoly of a single player (the Jorginho of the situation).

WHAT FORM WAS IT?
So in what form did Pirlo’s Juve play? Does it still make sense to talk about modules? When journalists do the match report, they must necessarily summarize, which means choosing, simplifying. You will certainly have read (and not without reason) about 3-4-3, 3-4-1-2, 3-5-2. Above we have room to understand each other a little better: Juve in the first half started from a four-man defensive system, a very traditional 4-4-2.

Any defensive situation confirms this. Central pair: Bonucci, Chiellini.
Full Backs: Danilo and Alex Sandro. Medfielders: Rabiot, McKennie. Forwards: Ronaldo, Kulusevski.

Ramsey’s position is significant, where Allegri and Sarri usually deployed Ronaldo’s bag holder, a factotum, a hard worker ready to sacrifice himself to balance the team. Let’s try to understand the reason for this choice.

THE TRICK – It would be equally misleading to just say 4-4-2. Very limiting. We must in fact consider a trick. Under construction and offensive development.

A push that triggered the variations, first of all transforming the four-man defense into a three-way setting: Alex Sandro went up to fix the width on the left, practically up to the defensive line of the opponents.

Danilo on the other hand was tight, but so was Ramsey the left midfielder of the 4-4-2. On the right, Cuadrado stared at the opposite width to Alex Sandro.

To be very precise, we could not have established whether it was a 3-4-1-2, a 3-4-3 or a 3-5-2 in the offensive phase.

In fact, Ramsey’s position was so unstable, variable, and so knowingly indeterminate, that talking about the role again would have been reductive.

In construction Ramsey floated at will between the lines, as did the two forwards. More often he sought a position in agreement with that of CR7.

At first he was in the center (Ronaldo moved freely, without any constraints, but never as a winger), the Welshman was almost the third attacker on the left or the left midfielder (if we want to use this outdated terminology again), but when Ronaldo rested just out of the way on the center-left, Ramsey moved to the center, a bit trocar a bit false nine.

We would first say that it invaded and occupied the spaces between the lines, like Kulusevski and CR7. In free associations with CR7 and Kulusevski.

Risk – At one point Juve was similar to those musical compositions that were partly structured and partly random. The low build was quite stiff, with the three stuck in front of the halfway circle. On the opponent’s trocar, on the other hand, inside this orange circle, faces and jersey numbers were indifferent, a real bubble of uncertainty. During possession, in fact, the constellations of players inside this space were changeable and, above all, indeterminable.

WITHOUT CR7: PURE 3-4-3 – In the second half, however, or without CR7, Juve took the field with a very pure 3-4-3 and perhaps a little more ‘rigid’.

Ramsey had definitively abandoned the function of winger in midfield to become one of the three very close forwards, the one on the left.

In the center of the Tridentine there was Pjaca, while on the right, also practically never with his feet on the side foul line, Douglas Costa.

Wide to fix the width were Pellegrini on one side and Cuadrado on the other. In the middle of the field, instead of the positives Rabiot and McKennie, Arthur and Bentancur played.

The constant of this match was in fact the doble pivote, the real news of the day. Doesn’t Pirlo want Pirli? Is this a way to make construction less predictable?

Look where the two arms of the three-man defense of the second half stood (two full backs!): Practically at the height of the two midfielders, with Demiral behind to make the support.

To close the game without smudging and goals conceded, Pirlo then opted for a defensive retreat that did not disdain a five-way line behind, with Nicolussi Caviglia who, having entered Ramsey’s place, returned to lend a hand to the two midfielders a little more than Douglas Costa, the other outside of the trident.

Article translated from the original source: https://www.ilbianconero.com/a/la-mano-pesante-di-andrea-pirlo-si-e-gia-vista-ha-ancora-senso-p-28103?utm_medium=pagina

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